Nonprofit donations for Women's Causes Grew Exponentially

Girls in Tech – it’s time for a REAL change. Invest in women, here’s why.

The women’s revolution has definitely been heating up in the past few years. Here is the staggering proof. Look at the chart! The giant spike in donations to female related causes is because of many female leaders and activists that are not afraid to ROAR!!! Female business leaders, entertainers, spiritual leaders and women everywhere are all joining forces to amplify the volume of our voices. Organizations like Women Moving Millions, Code Pink, NOW, TEDxWomen and many more empowering all of us to seize the day.

Today unlike any other time in my lifetime, the feminist movement is raging. I am so excited to be in San Francisco for all of this. In this city, people are open minded and liberal, in the same wave length as I. I feel very at home here. However, the tech industry which is dominant in the Bay Area, is totally a BOY’S world! Even though we represent 51% of the populations, at every event I find myself being one of the few women in the room.

There are many organizations devoted to empowering women in the tech industry. Girls in Tech, Geek Girl Dinners, Women2.0, Girls Who Codes, etc. are some of the organizations paving the way in this movement. They gather together, mentor and nurture each other. But where are they when it comes to taking a stand? Making a pitch? Taking a seat at the table?

Women, we need to rise up. It’s time. The time is now. Stand up. Scream. Shout. Blaze a path that few other women have gone. Give back, mentor, help the next generation of girls so they could rise above societal oppression….even in America in 2013. Make it count, we only have one life!

Did you know?

The high-tech companies that women build are more capital- efficient than the norm. [2011]*

Despite often being capital-constrained, women-owned businesses are more likely to survive the transition from raw start-up to established company than the average company. [2011]

Organizations that are the most inclusive of women in top management achieve 35 percent higher returns on equity and 34 percent better total return to shareholders versus their peers.

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Twenty years after women became the majority on campus, college administrators are struggling to strike a gender balance even as female applicants outnumber men by nearly 30 percent. [2010]

Nationally about 58 percent of college undergraduates are women, with some campuses at 70 percent. [2010]

Alerted by media reports that some admissions officers may be accepting less-qualified male students over female applicants, the Civil Rights Commission is investigating whether women are being discriminated against in college admissions. [2010]
28,962 — Number of women who earned doctorate degrees at U.S. colleges and universities during the 2008-09 academic year.
28,469 — Number of men who earned doctorate degrees during the 2008-09 academic year.
Zero — Years before 2008-09 in which women earned more doctorates than men.
51 — Percent of the U.S. population that is female. [2010]
57 — Percent of undergraduates in the United States who are female. [2010]
39 — Percent of undergraduates in 1960 who were women.
30 — Percent of undergraduates in 1947 who were women.
9.1 — Percent of bachelor’s degrees in business in 1970-71 that were earned by women.
50 — Percent of bachelor’s degrees in business in 2001-02 that were earned by women.
$87,206 — Average salary for a male college faculty member in 2009-10.
$70,600 — Average salary for a female college faculty member in 2009-10. [2010] *

Business & Leadership

Women own 40% of businesses in the US and growing at a rate of 2x faster than businesses as a whole- these 8 million women-owned enterprises have an annual economic impact of nearly $3 trillion.

According to World Bank estimates, women own or operate between 25-33% of all private businesses globally.

46% of women-owned companies earn $10,000 or less and about 80 percent have annual revenues of less than $50,000. Despite the growing number of women entrepreneurs, only 3 percent of women-owned businesses have revenues of $1 million or more compared with 6 percent of men-owned businesses.

At the DAVOS WEF (World Economic Forum) in Sweden: 80 percent of attendees were men, women often were a minority of one on panels or not represented at all. Sheryl Sandberg was one of six co-chairs of the forum; the rest were men. Panels on the future of banking, energy supplies, international finance and global risks were among those with no women except moderators, even with a forum theme of “The Great Transformation: Shaping New Models.”

About 20 percent of the panel speakers at 2012 WEF were women, up from 17 percent last year. About 80 percent of the WEF’s partner companies brought mixed-gender delegations.

Mary Tolan, the founder and CEO of Accretive Health Inc., was the only woman around the table at WEF.

Nearly 50 years after the Equal Pay Act became law, American women working full-time are paid just 77 cents to the dollar compared to their male counterparts.

Due to the wage gap, full-time working women in New York collectively lose more than $22,340,000,000 each year. If the wage gap is closed, working women in New York and their families would have enough money for more than a year’s worth of food; 4.4 months of mortgage and utility payments; 9 additional months of rent; 3 extra years of family health insurance premiums; or more than 2,000 gallons of gas.

Among Fortune 500 companies, women constitute only 3 percent of the CEO s, 6 percent of the top paying positions and 16 percent of the corporate officers. [2009]

Women have reached the CEO level in only four of the 14 industries covered by the Fortune 500—and even in these four industries, over 95% of the CEOs are male. [2009]

Among Fortune 500 companies, women account for 15 percent of the board members; 13 percent of these companies have no women on their boards. [2009]

women make up 48 percent of the labor force and 51 percent of all management/administrative/professional positions – but progress beyond this point is stalled and has been for the past three years. [2009]

The wage gap widens as women age and move up the ladder into management. Women make only 78 percent of what men make – an improvement of less than half a penny a year since 1963 when The Equal Pay Act was signed. African-American women make 64 percent and Hispanic women make 52 percent of what white men make. [2009] (What happened to that stats on Asian women?)

Profits at Fortune 500 firms that most aggressively promoted women have been shown to be 34% higher than industry medians. [2009]

A recent report called Women Matter 2010 found that companies with a higher proportion of women in their executive committees are also the companies that have the best performance. [2011]

Firms with women investment partners are 70 percent more likely to lead an investment in a woman entrepreneur than those with only male partners. [2011]

The high-tech companies that women build are more capital- efficient than the norm. [2011]*

Despite often being capital-constrained, women-owned businesses are more likely to survive the transition from raw start-up to established company than the average company. [2011]

Organizations that are the most inclusive of women in top management achieve 35 percent higher returns on equity and 34 percent better total return to shareholders versus their peers. Research shows that gender diversity is particularly valuable where innovation is a key asset. [2011]

Women currently hold 2.8 percent of Fortune 500 CEO roles and 3.3 percent of Fortune 1000 CEO roles. [2011]

Overall, Women in Business in 2010 only included 7.6 percent of Fortune 500 top earners, 51.5 percent of management, professional, and related occupations, and 46.7 percent of the U.S. labor force. [2011] – Oh so sad! We must change this. The time is now!

Median earnings for most women of color are even lower. In 2009, the earnings of African American women were 67.5 percent of all men’s earnings, and Latinas’ earnings were 57.7 percent of all men’s earnings. [2011]

Additionally, more than half of married households have both spouses working and therefore women’s pay inequity hurts these middle class families’ economic stability. In single parent households, more often than not it is a woman as the sole caretaker of the children. [2011]

Women may lose $434,000 in income, on average, over their lifetime due to the career wage gap. This harms women’s ability to save for the future, including retirement and their children’s higher education. [2011]

Women with college degrees earn about $713,000 less than men over 40-year careers. [2011]

The legal profession had the biggest pay gap – a lifetime pay gap of $1,481,000. [2011]

A recent report showed that for 111 occupations for which there was sufficient data to analyze, women earned less than men in 107, or 96 percent of these occupations. [2011]

The four occupations where women make more than men are: combined food prep and serving workers, including fast food (112.1 percent), bill and account collectors (109.5 percent) stock clerks and order fillers (105.1 percent), and counselors (104.9 percent). [2011]

*http://www.womenmovingmillions.org/how-we-do-it/facts/